Summer Reading

Book

SIX BOOKS TO INSPIRE AND ENTERTAIN OVER THE LONG (HOPEFULLY) HOT DAYS AHEAD.

The Ride Journal is a bargain at £7. The Ride Journal uses its 170 pages to delve into history, poetry, reportage, passion and design. Composed of short articles and essays from a variety of authors, some witty, some inspirational. Dip in an out of The Ride, between visits to the bar and pool.

David Millar's autobiography drips with visceral descriptions of all the agonies of cycling. Racing Through The Dark is honest and in-depth, detailing his fall from grace amidst a doping scandal, falling out of love with the sport and then his re-discovery. Millar is the only Briton to wear the leader's jersey in all three big tours. A greater achievement still is that Millar has broken a previous generation's omerta on drug use, and shone through as a voice of experience and unofficial spokesman for the peloton.

Fancy something not so real? The Rider is an essential read. Ever wondered about road racing, the suffering, insanity and pleasure it brings? Every bike racer will identify with the thoughts of Krabbé. A short piece of fictional writing that will leave you inspired.

Olympic Gangster is classified as ‘true crime/sport'. It's an eye-catching and intriguing combination. The book tells the story of the many lives of Jose Beyeart, aged 23; surprise winner of the London 1948 Olympic road race, treasure hunter, logger, drug runner, assassin, professional in Europe and winner of the Tour of Colombia. A riveting tale that would seem like fiction, if it weren't for Matt Rendell's impeccable research.

If you can't leave road racing at home whilst on the family holiday or simply want to read all about this year's Tour star, Thomas Voeckler, then the latest issue of Rouleur magazine has an interview with the battling French professional.

Still full of Tour de France withdrawal? Ned Boulting recounts the highs and lows of covering the Tour de France. Often funny and insightful, his book, How I Won The Yellow Jumper, tackles the pressures on both the reporters and riders. It follows his transformation from blundering football pundit to a Tour de France TV legend alongside such names as Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen.

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