How to wash a bike like a pro

It is vital for the riders in the team to have sparkling clean bikes every time they race and this can be day after day if the team is riding a stage race. Cleaning helps identify any maintenance work required that even the rider hasn't spotted. We spoke to our pro team mechanic Iain to advise on that dreaded task: washing bikes! If you are pushed for time, take note of Iain's tip: "Just clean the chain, cassette and rear derailleur. As long as these are taken care of your bike will have a longer life."

 

"The chain, cassette and rear derailleur are important parts of your bike's transmission. A build up of gunk and grime will accelerate wear on these parts and reduce how smoothly you can change gear" explains Iain. "Spray the chain all over with Muc-Off Drivetrain Cleaner. This will remove any debris and sticky residues that you can't see, and make for a free-running chain."

Shop the items: Muc-Off C3 Lube 

  • Don't forget to allow your bike to dry after you've washed it. Use Muc-Off Bike Spray this is a water disperser and pushes water out to stop surface rust. Then wipe the bike with bike polish and a  microfibre mitt to keep the frame shinny and protected. 
  • Don't spray high pressure water directly into the hubs of the wheels or headset. It can push out the grease that helps the parts move freely and keep rust at bay.
  • Don't neglect your front mech. "It is hard to reach and often jammed with crud making the pivots drier than a cream cracker. That's where a brush set can come in handy. Then add a drop of lube to the pivots."
  • Don't forget your brakes. "Grit builds up on the brake pads and on the rims. The grit acts like sandpaper and can wear the brake pads and braking surface of the wheels down" says Spike. "Dig out any small pieces of aluminium or stone that might be in the brake pads."

Previous Post Next Post